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Trey Griffey signed with the Colts on Sunday, ESPN's Mike Wells reports.

Impact

Griffey (6-3, 209) offers appealing size for a wideout but his minimal production at the collegiate level is a cause for concern. His best chance of making the team will come if he can prove to possess high upside as a red-zone threat.

Brad Kaaya should compete with Jake Rudock for the No. 2 quarterback job, Dave Birkett of The Detroit Free Press reports.

Impact

The Lions made it clear how much they think of Rudock by uncharacteristically carrying him as their No. 3 QB on the active roster the majority of the 2016 season – in order to ensure another team couldn't sign him off their practice squad – and subsequently parting ways with incumbent backup quarterback Dan Orlovsky earlier this offseason. However, Detroit management probably wasn't expecting a quarterback of Kaaya's caliber to fall to the end of the sixth round and couldn't resist when he landed in their laps. While the Miami (Fl.) product might lack the ideal frame to succeed at the professional level, he likely offers higher upside than Rudock and could make a bid for the backup job out of the gates if he can put together impressive summer and preseason showings.

Marquel Lee was told by Raiders GM Reggie McKenzie that he'll have a chance to earn the starting spot at middle linebacker during his rookie campaign, Scott Bair of CSNBayArea.com reports.

Impact

Lee, who was drafted in the fifth round on Saturday, will be part of a battle for the starting role at middle linebacker in Oakland among a severely thin and inexperienced corps. Cory James and Ben Heeney currently round out the remaining options at MLB, but the team may still look to sign a veteran. Lee, a solid run defender, will have to polish his craft in coverage situations in order to potentially earn the job.

With the Saints signing Adrian Peterson (knee) last week-and drafting tailback Alvin Kamara in the third round of the NFL Draft, The Times-Picayune's Larry Holder speculates that the team's likely plan is to deploy a three-headed attack at running back similar to the Saints' potent 2009 and 2011 backfields.

Impact

Both the 2009 and 2011 teams finished sixth in the league in rushing, but head coach Sean Payton's three-man committees were a nightmare for fantasy owners, with no Saints running back scoring more than six touchdowns or rushing for 800 yards. This year, it is expected that Ingram and Peterson will serve as the more traditional running backs, running between the tackles, while Kamara will compete with Travaris Cadet to be the third-down or satellite back. However, it is still unclear how the touches between the backs will be divided. After rushing for a career-high 1,043 yards and scoring ten total touchdowns, Ingram is likely to see the most snaps given his familiarity with the Saints' system, but he will undoubtedly lose carries to Peterson and receptions to Kamara or Cadet, hampering his value.

Head coach Hue Jackson said 2017 second-round draft pick DeShone Kizer will have a chance to compete with Brock Osweiler and Cody Kessler for the starting job, Mary Kay Cabot of The Cleveland Plain Dealer reports.

Impact

Acquired along with a 2018 second-round draft pick as part of a salary dump earlier in the offseason, Osweiler is on the books for a guaranteed $16 million salary in 2017 – giving the Browns little incentive to release him at this juncture. He thus figures to be part of the team's quarterback competition, though he'd presumably have to outshine the 23-year-old Kessler and 21-year-old Kizer by a wide margin to actually win the starting job for a rebuilding team. While they wouldn't get any cap relief from releasing Osweiler, the Browns might ultimately decide they prefer 24-year-old Kevin Hogan as the third quarterback for the final roster. Kizer and Kessler are obvious locks to make the team, with the latter an early favorite to start Week 1.

Travaris Cadet will have to compete with 2017 third-round selection Alvin Kamara for snaps on passing downs, Nick Underhill of The New Orleans Advocate reports.

Impact

The Saints surrendered a 2018 second-round pick to move up for Kamara, who caught 40 passes for 392 yards and four touchdowns last season at the University of Tennessee while serving as the lightning to Jalen Hurd's thunder. The team made far less of an investment in Cadet, who re-signed on a one-year contract with a signing bonus of only $80,000. While he'll likely get a shot to retain his pass-catching role, Cadet could find himself on the wrong side of the roster bubble if Kamara impresses during training camp and the preseason. Kamara, Mark Ingram and Adrian Peterson are locks for the final roster, potentially leaving Cadet to compete with Daniel Lasco and Marcus Murphy for a spot that could be decided on the basis of special teams value.

Rudy Ford is expected to begin his career as an outside cornerback, Kyle Odegard of the Cardinals' official site reports.

Impact

A safety during his time at Auburn, Ford will work as an outside CB, with the versatility to log time at safety, nickel corner and as a special teamer. The Cardinals currently have a question mark opposite Patrick Peterson as the other starting cornerback, where veteran Justin Bethel is the leader in the clubhouse. However, injuries and circumstance haven't allowed Bethel consistent run in the role, affording Ford and 2016 third-round pick Brandon Williams an opportunity as well.

With the 49ers opting not to draft a top-end safety in the draft, Jimmie Ward (collarbone) will move to free safety in 2017, Matt Maiocco of NBC Sports Bay Area reports.

Impact

Ward – who was drafted as a safety in 2014 – has been playing both the nickel and cornerback positions with the 49ers over the past three seasons. With Kyle Shanahan bringing in a new 4-3 defense based off of the scheme that the Seattle Seahawks run, the 25-year-old will fill a coverage safety role similar to Earl Thomas. San Francisco is expected to pick up Ward's fifth-year rookie option, and having him listed as a safety would save the team roughly $2.5 million in cap space. If he does indeed stick at safety this season, he could see an uptick in tackles, providing a boost to his IDP value.

Haason Reddick will begin his career working behind starting inside linebackers Karlos Dansby and Deone Bucannon, Darren Urban of the Cardinals' official site reports.

Impact

Reddick made his mark at Temple as a defensive end/outside linebacker, but his ability to pick up inside linebacker at the Senior Bowl pushed his stock high enough to be selected 13th overall by Arizona in the recently concluded draft. Such adaptability will help him earn snaps right off the bat as a pass rusher in nickel formations, despite sitting behind Dansby and Bucannon on the depth chart. During his final collegiate season, Reddick racked up 65 tackles, including 10.5 sacks and 22.5 tackles for loss, three forced fumbles and an interception across 14 games. With such a varied skill set, he should further bolster a Cardinals defense that ranked first in the NFL last season in the sack department.

Tahir Whitehead will potentially start at outside linebacker for the Lions in 2017 with first-round pick Jarrad Davis slated to play middle linebacker, Michael Rothstein of ESPN.com reports.

Impact

Whitehead is in the final year of his contract in Detroit after racking up a career-high 132 tackles in 2016. Despite logging double-digit tackles in nine games last year, the team was expected to bring in competition at linebacker, which came in the form of Davis during the draft.

The Chargers surprisingly opted to use the No. 7 overall pick in the 2017 draft on Clemson wideout Mike Williams, who will join a receiving corps that already includes Travis Benjamin (knee), Tyrell Williams and Keenan Allen (knee), Dan Woike of The Los Angeles Times reports.

Impact

Despite signing a four-year, $24 million contract last offseason, Benjamin already finds himself in danger of slipping to the No. 4 spot on the depth chart. Mike Williams is a pro-ready prospect with potential to start from day one, and Tyrell Williams is coming off a breakout 1,000-yard season. Meanwhile, Benjamin is looking to bounce back from a disappointing 2016 campaign in which he struggled with a knee injury, ultimately requiring arthroscopic surgery in January. The Chargers expect both Allen and Benjamin to be ready for Week 1, but the latter may be limited to a part-time role on offense, along with his usual spot in the return game.

The Chargers surprisingly opted to use the No. 7 overall pick in the 2017 draft on Clemson wideout Mike Tyrell Williams, who will join a receiving corps that already includes (Tyrell) Williams, Keenan Allen (knee) and Travis Benjamin (knee), Dan Woike of The Los Angeles Times reports.

Impact

Tyrell Williams entered 2016 as the Chargers' No. 3/4 wideout but finished the season as the team's go-to target, outlasting Allen (torn ACL) and outplaying Benjamin. With all three wideouts expected to be healthy by Week 1, it came as a major surprise when the Chargers selected Mike Williams instead of a defensive player in the first round. The end result is a very crowded receiving corps, though in light of what happened last season it would seem Benjamin's workload is in more danger than (Tyrell) Williams'. There's also plenty of competition for touches from the other positions, as running back Melvin Gordon and tight end Hunter Henry thrived alongside (Tyrell) Williams in an injury-riddled Chargers offense. Even if he manages to retain the No. 2 receiver spot, Williams will face a difficult path to matching last year's 120 targets.

Jarrad Davis will play middle linebacker for the Lions according to GM Bob Quinn, Michael Rothstein of ESPN.com reports.

Impact

Davis, who was selected 21st overall by the Lions, is expected to start, with Tahir Whitehead potentially moving over to start on the outside. Davis is an athletic defender and will look to make an impact immediately for the Lions.

Lions general manger Bob Quinn said the door is still open for Anquan Boldin to re-sign with the team, Dave Birkett of The Detroit Free Press reports. "We've had some communication with Anquan," Quinn said. "That was back in I'd say March, so really no update on our end of things. I know they said he's been communicating with a couple other teams, but nothing to update. Door's open."

Impact

Rumored to have interest in some of the draft's top wideouts, Detroit ultimately waited on the position until the end of the third round, selecting Northern Illinois product Kenny Golladay at No. 96 overall. The Lions might not mind having Golladay compete with T.J. Jones, Jace Billingsley and others for the No. 3 role, but Boldin's presence would provide some stability for an offense that otherwise appears set across the board. The 36-year-old is expected to wait until June or July to officially sign with a team. Another one of his former squads, the Ravens, has also expressed interest and has a more glaring need for receiving talent. Denver could also be a fit.

Head coach Ron Rivera said he is concerned about Kelvin Benjamin's weight again, Joe Person of The Charlotte Observer reports.

Impact

Benjamin's weight/conditioning was also a concern last offseason as he prepared to return from the torn ACL that wiped out his entire 2015 campaign. While the issue didn't prevent him from stepping back in as Carolina's top wideout, he did handle an unusually small workload for a No. 1 receiver, playing only 72 percent of the team's offensive snaps despite suiting up for all 16 games. Benjamin started the year with a pair of strong outings and finished with a pair of strong outings, but the 12-game stretch in between was a massive disappointment, limiting him to a final stat line of 63 catches for 941 yards and seven touchdowns on 118 targets (7.9 yards per target). He'll have more time to get in shape this offseason without the added burden of injury rehab, but it does seem the Panthers are aiming for a spread-the-wealth offensive attack, having used their first two draft picks on pass-catching back Christian McCaffrey (No. 8 overall) and dual-threat receiver Curtis Samuel (No. 40). Although the team recently picked up his fifth-year option, Benjamin still faces a difficult path toward reprising the kind of true No. 1 wideout workload (146 targets) he garnered as a rookie back in 2014.

Doug Martin (suspension) has additional competition in the Buccaneers' backfield after the selection of Jeremy McNichols (shoulder) during this year's NFL Draft, Rick Stroud of the Tampa Bay Times reports.

Impact

One can speculate that the Buccaneers didn't select a running back before the fifth round due to Martin's showing in the offseason program to date. Indeed, he impressed general manager Jason Licht on the first day of the offseason program, looking "as good as I've seen him since I've been here, from a physical standpoint," according to Jenna Laine of ESPN.com. Having said that, Martin will likely have to avoid any stumbles in the coming months in order to solidify his previous standing as the Buccaneers' No. 1 running back. As for the other members of the backfield, McNichols will strive to compete with Jacquizz Rodgers and Charles Sims (pectoral) for that spot during Martin's suspension to start this season, but the rookie's climb will be hampered by rehabilitation from surgery to repair a torn labrum in his shoulder. Assuming Martin continues to hearken back to better days, he's the logical candidate to serve as the team's top RB for the final 13 games of the campaign.

Jeremy McNichols underwent surgery to repair a torn labrum in his shoulder following the Combine, Rick Stroud of the Tampa Bay Times reports.

Impact

McNichols strangely took a nosedive during this year's NFL Draft, falling to the Buccaneers as the 162nd overall pick, but head coach Dirk Koetter revealed the running back's recent health concern during a media session on Saturday evening. Koetter believes McNichols will be healthy by the time training camp rolls around, almost certainly hindering his participation during the rest of the offseason program. Although adept as both a runner and pass catcher, McNichols may be left behind in the competition for top running back during the remaining three games of Doug Martin's suspension to begin the upcoming season. On the other hand, an impressive training camp and preseason slate could help McNichols jump Jacquizz Rodgers and Charles Sims (pectoral) in the RB pecking order.

Lions general manager Bob Quinn said Ameer Abdullah will be the team's starting running back, ESPN.com's Michael Rothstein reports.

Impact

Abdullah has quietly been one of the offseason's biggest winners, as the Lions haven't made any notable free-agent additions at running back and also didn't use any draft picks on the position. What's more, Abdullah was medically cleared in March to return from the foot injury that cost him the final 14 games of last season – giving him a full offseason to prepare for his third professional campaign. Theo Riddick (wrist) is locked in on passing downs and Zach Zenner or Dwayne Washington could handle the short-yardage work, but Abdullah seemingly has a clear path to a role as the primary ball carrier. Following the offseason additions of right tackle Ricky Wagner and right guard T.J. Lang, the Lions could have a productive running game for the first time since 2013. The team produced less than four yards per carry and 90 rushing yards per game in each of the past three seasons, deploying a rotating cast of lead backs along the way. Abdullah has the requisite running ability and supporting cast to finally seize the reins, but durability and ball security remain major concerns, buoyed by his lack of ideal size (5-foot-9, 203 pounds) for a lead back.

Ryan Mathews (neck) has been cleared to work out, Martin Frank of the Delaware News Journal reports.

Impact

General manager Howie Roseman said as much following the conclusion of the NFL Draft on Saturday. During the event, the Eagles expressed a pseudo vote of confidence in their existing running back corps, bringing in just Donnel Pumphrey in the fourth round. Before he can begin fending off the likes of Darren Sproles and Wendell Smallwood (knee) in the offseason program, Mathews' primary hurdle remains his recovery from surgery on a herniated disk in his neck. Although Mathews is now able to work out, the extent of his activity is unknown upon the completion of Phase 1 of the program this past week.

Ty Montgomery (ribs) remains the Packers' No. 1 RB, despite the team selecting three players at the position during the 2017 NFL Draft, Rob Demovsky of ESPN.com reports. "Absolutely, he's our starting running back," head coach Mike McCarthy said Saturday. "I think it gives us excellent depth, and it will be nice to have a full room."

Impact

Montgomery worked his way into Green Bay's backfield as last season wore on, primarily due to a need for bodies due to injuries to Eddie Lacy (ankle) and James Starks (knee/concussion). Finishing the season as the team leader in carries (77) and rushing yards (457), Montgomery also provided a dual threat due to his prior role as a wideout, with 44 receptions (on 56 targets) for 348 yards by campaign's end. After the Packers were ousted in the NFC championship game, McCarthy relayed that Montgomery should be considered a running back moving forward, and Lacy's departure in free agency spurred the head honcho to express confidence in Montgomery as a starting RB. The addition of Jamaal Williams, Aaron Jones and Devante Mays via the draft hasn't altered McCarthy's resolve one iota, helping Montgomery maintain his standing within the offense.